I-Reflexes is the first of the performance projects that form the basis of this thesis. In this piece, I explore factors that influence real time decision-making in dance improvisation performance. I-Reflexes captures the improvisational interaction of three performers: myself as solo dancer, a music improviser and a sonic artist, involving audience participation via the use of their mobile phones.

In this work, I used ringtones to trigger unplanned reflex-like movements in my dance improvisation, exploring what this might suggest in terms of conscious awareness over sound and my affective experience of dancing. The idea for this performance evolved from my curiosity at people’s spontaneous physical reactions to sounds emitted from mobile communication devices. The movement tasks I developed for this piece were developed from observing movement responses to ringtones by myself, and others. These initial observations led me to explore the role of conscious awareness in this hearing-moving dynamic and how pre-set sounds trigger an action response similar to a bodily reflex.

I-Reflexes was performed in five occasions. All five shows were performed under extremely different conditions. This offered me a multiplicity of experiences from which to reflect on my research questions.